The Fate of Food – Book Review

What’s for dinner?

The Fate of Food will give you a good overview of how tradition and technology might come together to feed the world in the future.

I guess you could say that my purchase of The Fate of Food was an impulse buy (a good one).

In early November last year, I went into a Barnes & Noble store in San Luis Obispo, CA to buy a 2020 mini wall calendar to put up on the tack board next to my desk. My plan had been to quickly find a calendar, buy it, and then move on to the next errand on my list.

The calendar with the words “Serenity quotes for a peaceful mind” superimposed over a photo of a lovely calm looking lake appealed to me. I took it off the rack and turned around intending to walk back to the checkout counter. On the way, I decided I would just pop over to the environment/nature section to scout for new books that I might want to read in the future.

Standing there clutching my calendar I avidly scanned the titles. The Fate of Food: What We’ll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World by Amanda Little caught my eye. I pulled the book off the shelf and flipped through it reading the book jacket and table of contents.

It looked interesting so I bought the book along with the calendar.

Book Review

The Fate of Food opens with Amanda Little recounting her tour of the Wise Company, a survival food maker in Salt Lake City, UT. This visit occurred after she had traveled to thirteen states in the U.S. and eleven countries pursuing an answer to the question “What will be for dinner in the future?”

I knew I was going to like the book when I read the following paragraph at the top of page 8.

“After my visit to the Wise factory, I whip up a bowl of rehydrated pot pie. In truth, I ask my kids to do it. They fire up the electric kettle, pour, stir, wait for the pebbly chunks to soften. To them, it’s a simple science experiment. To me, it’s confronting a future I don’t want to meet.”

It was heartening to discover that along with delivering facts, information, and stories about other people, Little was willing to share herself with me and you.

The Fate of Food Book Cover

Reading The Fate of Food you will learn a lot of things, sometimes fascinating things, about apple farming, robots, aeroponics and aquaculture, animal-free meat, food waste, water, cloud seeding, moringa trees, and 3-D printed food.

You will also have an opportunity to ponder ways that small-scale and industrial-scale farming could be transformed to feed the world in a way that is healthy for people and the planet.

Here are a few snapshots of what you will be reading.

Chapter 3 – Seeds of Drought

In this section, you will meet Kenyan Ruth Oniang’o the founder of Rural Outreach Program of Africa that focuses on improving agricultural productivity while protecting small farmers. GMOs (genetically modified organisms) and bioengineered food are covered here as well as the dilemma faced by countries who are struggling to grow their own food.

“I am talking about using technology—modern seeds, modern methods—to benefit humanity, to produce food that’s clean, abundant, and climate-smart, in a way that frees small-scale farmers from drudgery. We shall industrialize our food production while maintaining the core of who we are.”

Ruth Oniang’o
Chapter 7 – Tipping the Scales

Chances are you have heard the term aquaculture (think farm-raised salmon). This chapter explores the potential benefits and challenges associated with farming aquatic animals and plants in oceans, specialized ponds, and tanks. If you are not currently familiar with algal blooms, sea lice, or the resource efficiency of fish farming, you will be.

Chapter 10 – Pipe Dreams

Without water there is no food and agriculture is a thirsty business. This chapter provides a look at how Israel, a country with very little freshwater, handles its water supply. Other topics discussed here include desalination, closed-loop water recycling, and using cloud-based applications to detect leaks.

The book closes with Little’s visit to the farm of Chris and Annie Newman who are reimagining farming.

“I was taught early on that we live within the ecosystem, not on top of it.”

Chris Newman

The Bottom Line

Amanda Little is a journalist and a professor teaching investigative journalism and science writing at Vanderbilt University. She is also the author of Power Trip: The Story of America’s Love Affair with Energy.

The Fate of Food is a readable book that packs in a lot of material about many different food-related subjects. I think Little’s writing style and the way she conveys information in a story-like manner will appeal to a wide audience. What makes this book special to me is that Little relates to us, her readers, as fellow human beings.

After reading The Fate of Food, I hope you will feel optimistic and motivated to learn more about one or more of the topics covered in the book.

Featured Image at Top

A place setting sits on top of a green place mat – photo iStock/kyoshino.

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The Reducetarian Solution – Book Review

Something for everyone.

If you have been noodling around the idea of eating less meat, reading The Reducetarian Solution just might give you the nudge you need to start doing it.

A few weeks ago, I spotted The Reducetarian Solution, edited by Brian Kateman, in a Meatless Monday post entitled Give the Gift of Meatless Monday with these 8 Inspiring Books. Frankly one of the reasons the book appealed to me is that the word reducetarian seemed weird and wonky. I was intrigued.

The full title of the book The Reducetarian Solution: How the Surprisingly Simple Act of Reducing the Amount of Meat in Your Diet Can Transform Your Health and the Planet reeled me in. I care about the health of people, animals, and the planet.

It also occurred to me that this book might be a good source of inspiration for people pondering a 2019 New Year’s resolution involving eating more plants and less meat so I decided to read it now rather than later in the year.

Book Review

In the summer of 2014, Brian Kateman and his friend Tyler Alterman came up with the term reducetarian to provide an inclusive identity for people along the continuum of eating less meat and doing it for any reason.

The Reducetarian Solution Book CoverThe Reducetarian Solution is a collection of short essays loosely grouped into three sections: mind, body, and planet.

Chances are you will be familiar with one or more of the people who authored essays for the book. Each one provides a distinct perspective on eating less meat through the lens of reducetarianism. There is sure to be at least one essay that resonates with you.

Here is a sampling.

Mind
  • Less Meat; More Dough – illustrates how eating less meat can be good for your wallet and points out that even the stock market is taking notice that Americans are eating less meat.
  • Beyond Carnism – questions what causes us to treat farm animals differently than pets.
  • From MREs to McRibs: Military Influence on American Meat Eating – provides a glimpse into how the U.S. military is partly responsible for the type of meat available at your local supermarket.
Body
  • Listen to Your Body – reminds us that our body does actually let us know how it feels about what we put into it.
  • Fall in Love with Plants – suggests focusing on the amazing array of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds you can have on your plate instead of the meat that is not on it.
  • Antibiotic Resistance at the Meat Counter – brings to our attention the public health threat posed by the use of antibiotics on livestock animals.
Planet
  • Roll Your Own: Weekday Vegetarian – makes a simple yet important point about eating less meat “Every little reduction helps improve both personal and planetary health.”
  • An Uncertain Phosphorus Future – alerts us to the dangers of relying on synthetic fertilizers to grow food for animals and people.
  • Global Mega-Trends and the Role of the Food Business – explains how climate change, resource constraints, and technology intersect with food.

The last 60 or so pages of the book contain recipes for people who want to eat more plants and less meat. I think that Eat the Rainbow Pizza, Berry-Bean and Quinoa Salad, and Chocolate-Coconut Chunk Cookies look like recipes worth trying.

The Bottom Line

Coining the term reducetarian was just the beginning for Brian Kateman and Tyler Alterman. In 2015, they co-founded the Reducetarian Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to reducing meat consumption in order to create a healthy, sustainable, and compassionate world. Their intent is to build reducetarianism into an identity, a community, and a movement.

The Reducetarian Solution is an easy to read book that covers a lot of ground. Each essay is only a few pages long, so if you have a busy schedule, you can read the book in short bursts.

I still think the term reducetarian is weird, but I like the concept because it embraces anyone and everyone who is reducing their own meat consumption whether by a little or a lot and for reasons as varied as personal health, social justice, environmental protection, ethical treatment of animals, or anything else.

It is not too late to make a New Year’s resolution to eat more plants and less meat.

Featured Image at Top: Reducetarian Foundation Logo

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