Rise for Climate Wherever You Are on September 8, 2018

Pick up a sign and voilà you are an activist.

On September 8, 2018, join people around the world who are taking part in the Rise for Climate day of action to demand jobs, justice, and 100% renewable energy.

Rise for Climate is a worldwide event with hundreds of actions planned for the Saturday before the Global Climate Action Summit that California Governor Jerry Brown is hosting in San Francisco September 12-14, 2018.

If you can make it to San Francisco, you have an opportunity to participate in what is shaping up to be the largest climate march ever to occur on the West Coast. You could be one of the thousands of people taking to the streets carrying signs and loudly informing government officials and corporate CEOs that you want green jobs, environmental justice, and a society powered by renewable energy, now.

This may sound silly, but I can attest to the magic of picking up a sign and carrying it in a march with people of every hue, ethnicity, age, gender, and religion who have come together for a common purpose.

Although I am still a fledgling activist, my transformation began on February 7, 2015, at the March For Real Climate Leadership in Oakland, California.

My spouse and I were part of a contingent from San Luis Obispo who had boarded a bus in the pouring rain at 6:30 that morning. It was our first time participating in a protest march with thousands of other people.

Sign for March for Real Climate Leadership in Oakland, CA on February 7, 2015Being a newbie, it did not occur to me that I needed a sign until after I got off the bus in Oakland.

Fortunately, a volunteer walked by and pointed out a collection of signs made by a group of artistic volunteers. The sign I selected must have had magical powers because as soon as I hefted it and waved it about I felt like an activist.

For those of you who cannot go to San Francisco (like me) look for an action closer to home or create your action (suggestions at the end of this post).

“When you do nothing, you feel overwhelmed and powerless. But when you get involved, you feel the sense of hope and accomplishment that comes from knowing you are working to make things better.” —Pauline R. Kezer

Global Climate Action Summit

On June 1, 2017, President Trump announced that he was pulling the United States out of the Paris Agreement an international climate agreement adopted at the 2015 United Nations Framework on Climate Change. A month later, Governor Jerry Brown announced that the State of California would convene the world’s climate leaders in San Francisco in September 2018 for the Global Climate Action Summit.

“President Trump is trying to get out of the Paris Agreement, but he doesn’t speak for the rest of America. We in California and in states all across America believe it’s time to act, it’s time to join together and that’s why at this Climate Action Summit we’re going to get it done.” —Governor Jerry Brown (07/06/17 press release)

You can read about the Summit on the Global Climate Action Summit website.

Rise for Climate Global Day of Action

Long before email notices began appearing in my inbox a month or so ago, the Rise for Climate steering committee was already hard at work putting this global day of action together. 350.org is spearheading the event using their formidable Internet only organizing platform, but hundreds of local people and groups on five continents are doing the actual planning and organizing.

Climate change is not some amorphous future problem. It is already contributing to extreme heat, flooding, wildfires, pollution, and drought devastating the lives of people all over the world. Bureaucratic negotiations have been dragging on for decades and are not getting the job done.

People are mobilizing on September 8 to bring attention to the Global Climate Action Summit and to tell our state and local leaders that we need them to step up, now.

“We need every local government and institution to commit to building 100% renewable energy and stopping new dirty energy projects in their community. Anything less than that is out of line with what science and justice demand.”

You can find out about the San Francisco march and other actions around the world on the Rise for Climate website.

If You Cannot Be There, You Can Still Take Action

On September 8, I will be aboard the California Zephyr Amtrak train on my way to a visit Nebraska with two long-time friends so I cannot make it to San Francisco. However, I can still do something for the Rise for Climate global day of action and so can you even if you have to work that day, have already made other plans, or just cannot make it to San Francisco or a local event.

Here are a few ideas to get your creative juices flowing.

  • Spread the word about the Rise for Climate global day of action.
  • Talk to your family, friends, and/or coworkers about climate change and renewable energy.
  • Write a letter or call one or more of your state or local elected officials asking them to stop new fossil fuel projects and support renewable energy projects.
  • Walk, bike, or take public transportation to a place you would normally drive.
  • Call a local solar installer to make an appointment to evaluate your roof for solar panels.
  • Display a Rise for Climate poster in a visible location.
  • Follow the action on September 8 and share it on social media.
  • Wear a t-shirt promoting renewable energy.
  • Have some friends over to watch a film about oil and natural gas fracking or mountaintop removal coal mining.
  • Write a letter to the editor about Rise for Climate and/or the Global Climate Action Summit.
My Rise for Climate Actions

This blog post is a means of spreading the word and I will be promoting it on social media.

If this letter to the editor of the San Luis Obispo Tribune makes it into the paper, I will update this post.

2018-08-30 Rise for Climate San Luis Obispo Tribune Letter to the Editor

I printed the above posters to display on the windows of my train compartment and I made the flyer with a template. I have extras in case I meet any like-minded people on the train. I am grateful to the Rise for Climate artists that create flyers, posters, signs, banners, and other pieces of art for us to use (you can find them on the Rise for Climate website here).

What are you doing to Rise for Climate?

“Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.” —Barack Obama

Update: The San Luis Obispo Tribune chose not to publish my letter. On the train, many people walking by my compartment at least looked at the posters including the Amtrak staff. I am a fan of train travel so using paper and markers provided by my friend, I made an “I heart trains” poster and taped it to my window.

Featured Image at Top: Rise for Climate signs ready for the San Francisco March on September 8, 2018 – Photo Credit 350.org on Flickr

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Rooftop Solar Panels are Worth It and this is Why

Sunlight is clean, renewable, and free.

Homeowners when you install solar panels on your roof, you are making the world a better place, saving money on electricity, and increasing your home’s value. What could be better?

I know. That may sound like a grandiose statement but think about it.

You already know that burning fossil fuels is causing global warming and endangering our planet and the people living on it. You probably also know that the majority of electricity generated in the United States is produced by burning fossil fuels (63% in 2017). Hopefully, you agree that switching to clean renewable energy sources like the sun is a good idea and that we need to accomplish it sooner rather than later.

Every time a homeowner installs solar panels on their roof (or anyone installs solar panels on any roof), our society moves that much closer to getting off fossil fuels and that makes the world a better place for you, the people you love, and everyone else.

Unlike fossil fuel companies, the sun shares its energy free to everyone and it will continue to do so for another four or five billion years. To capture the sun’s energy and convert it into electricity you need a solar panel system and that is not free. Fortunately, nowadays, there are numerous options available to you, from paying cash for solar panels to renting your roof and paying a discounted rate for electricity.

In 2017, the California Regional Multiple Listing Service added fields to its system so realtors can enter solar power information for their listings in a consistent manner making it easier for homebuyers to compare homes. You can read more about this in the post You Can Increase Your Home’s Value with Owned Solar Panels.

I am grateful for the people who had the foresight to install rooftop solar panels decades ago. These early adopters created a demand for solar panels and along with early manufacturers and installers, they got the solar industry off the ground and worked through the technical and operational issues that often accompany a new product.

Five years ago, my spouse and I decided to join the rooftop solar revolution made possible by these solar pioneers.

Owning a Rooftop Solar Panel System

On March 8, 2018, the mini wall calendar that hangs by my desk informed me that on this day five years ago our new rooftop solar system generated its first kWh of electricity from the sun.

Since I am a data-loving kind of gal, the five-year mark seemed an ideal time to do a review of our system and electric bills. I thought it would be fun to attempt to answer the question, “Is solar worth it?” from a financial perspective because there seems to be a fixation on “Show me the money.” by the media, solar installers, and potential customers.

Solar Panel Character Grasping 100 Dollar Bills
Photo Credit – iStock/Talaj

At the time, I was working on our 2017 income taxes and thinking that a tax refund would make an excellent down payment for a rooftop solar system (hint, hint). In preparation for this post, I emailed Glen at A.M. Sun Solar (the company that did our installation) to ask him what our system would cost today.

Background

We moved to the Central California Coast from Southern California in 2007. The climate here is cool and sunny with average temperatures ranging from 55° in the winter to 65° in the summer although, in the last couple of years, days over 80° have increased.

Other than opening windows, we do not have air conditioning and our heating system runs on natural gas (ugh, another future project) so our electricity use is not as high as it would be in a hotter climate where more people have window air conditioners or central air conditioning. My spouse and I both work from home so we are home all day using electricity.

Before we installed solar panels, our average annual electricity cost was $1,742.

Purchasing Solar Panels versus Leasing

Our children, your children, and everyone else’s was our main motivation for installing solar panels on our roof. It was a way for us to be for something, to do our part in building a nationwide clean renewable energy network. Free electricity in the future was a bonus.

After deciding to install solar panels, we needed to figure out how we were going to pay for them.

Buying solar panels would require a significant cash outlay upfront; however, we knew that at some point we would recoup the system’s cost and that electricity would be virtually free indefinitely (at the end of the 20-30 year warranty period, solar panels may be less efficient but they do not stop working). On the other hand, a lease would have little or no initial cost and we would immediately be paying less for electricity.

We intend to live in our home for many years to come and we did have some money saved in our rainy day fund so we determined that purchasing a rooftop solar system was the right choice for us. The 30% federal tax incentive for renewable energy projects probably influenced us (a little bit). If we had not had the money, we likely would have pursued a home equity or solar loan.

Solar Panel System Cost and Electric Bills

We selected a locally owned solar installation company so we could support a small business in our community and we purchased equipment made in the United States to support American workers.

Danny from A.M. Sun Solar Beginning Our Rooftop Solar Installation
Danny from A.M. Sun Solar Beginning Our Rooftop Solar Installation in 2013.

Our system started out with 16 solar panels in 2013 and we added 6 more panels in 2014 after receiving a tax refund as a result of claiming the 30% federal tax incentive on our 2013 income tax return. We reported our second purchase on our 2014 income tax return lowering our tax liability.

The net cost of our 22-panel 5.34 kW solar system was $14,767.

Our system ties into PG&E’s electric grid so during the day when our solar panels are generating more electricity than we are using we send the excess to the grid to share with the community and we pull electricity from the grid at night or on exceedingly cloudy days.

We pay PG&E a monthly minimum fee of about $10.00 (it started out at $4.50). If we draw more electricity from the grid over a 12-month period than we send to it, we pay extra money to PG&E. If we send more electricity to the grid than we use, PG&E issues us a credit that we can use to pay our monthly fee until it runs out.

Twice a year (April and October), California residents receive a California Climate Credit on their electric bill funded by fees paid by power plants and other large industries that emit greenhouse gases. In 2018, the credit is $39.42 times two.

From March 2013 through March 2018, we paid PG&E a total of $644.

If you are interested in learning about our solar panel installation experience and how to make your own installation go smoothly, or how solar net energy metering works, I covered these topics in the posts Go Solar with Home Rooftop Photovoltaics – We Did and Rooftop Solar Costs Less than You Think.

Payback Period

A payback period is the length of time it takes an investment to recover its initial cost either in profits or savings. For a homeowner with owned rooftop solar panels, the payback period is however long it takes electricity savings to equal the cost of the system.

If you did not take into account rising electricity rates or any of the many variables that affect electric bills, and assuming that we did not pay another dime to PG&E our payback period would have been: $14,767 system cost divided $1,742 average annual electricity cost before solar = 8 years and 6 months.

After looking at five years of net energy metering bills, 21 PG&E rate schedules, and our system’s energy production data, I realized I would need a supercomputer to calculate accurately what we would have paid for electricity if we did not have solar panels.

Undaunted I decided to take a stab at a payback period anyway. Electricity price increases, a torrential downpour, and additional work-at-home occupants affected our payback period, which at this point, I estimate to be about 7 years so we are already 71% of the way there.

More details about how I estimated our payback timeframe are available by clicking on Rooftop Solar Payback Period Example.

Tax Incentives and Tariffs

Earlier in the post, I mentioned asking Glen from A.M. Sun Solar what a system similar to ours would cost now. His response was $17,586 a reduction of $3,510 (a whopping 16.6%). With the 30% tax incentive of $5,276, the net cost for the system would decrease even more to $12,310.

After December 31, 2019, the tax incentive decreases and then phases out at the end of 2021. Visit the DSIRE (Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy) website to learn more.

Oh, but wait. Have you seen in the news that the Trump Administration implemented a tariff on solar components in February this year? It starts at 30% for 2018. This could affect the cost of your installation, but even if it does, the tax incentive would probably cover it and then some.

Homes with Rooftop Solar Panels in Austin, TX Neighborhood
Homes with Rooftop Solar Panels in Austin, TX Neighborhood – Photo Credit iStock/Roschetzky

Electricity prices continue to rise (along with greenhouse gases) and solar panel prices have come down even with tariffs so now is a good time for you to seriously consider rooftop solar panels for your home.

Solar Panels Add Value to Your Life

While I was looking at data and doing calculations for the payback period, it occurred to me, that many if not most home improvements do not even have an expectation of a payback period.

For instance, what is the payback period on a $15,000 bathroom remodel or a $50,000 kitchen renovation? At what point do you recover the cost of a $10,000 roof replacement? There is no answer. Even when you sell your home, it is unlikely that you will recoup anywhere near the cost (if you doubt me, google it).

I can hear you saying, “But, I enjoy taking showers in my remodeled bathroom, I love cooking dinner in my renovated kitchen, or I am thankful my new roof is keeping the elements outside where they belong.” What you are really saying is “This adds value to my life.”

Let us return to the question, “Is solar worth it?” You know where I am going with this, right.

Solar panels add value to my life. To me, they are worth it.

Every time I look at the solar panels on our roof or pay my PG&E bill, I feel happy knowing that by generating renewable energy to run our home we are doing something positive that is good for the planet and the people we love. I admit contemplating free electricity in less than two years brings a smile to my face, too.

Perhaps rooftop solar panels could add value to your life.

If you call a solar installer today, you could have a solar panel system installed before the hottest part of the summer. What could be better?

Featured Image at Top: Pair of Hands Catching Sunbeams – Photo Credit iStock/ipopba

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