Native Plants Add Beauty and Habitat to Your Yard

“There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.” —Janet Kilburn Phillips

This spring give the birds, bees, and butterflies places to live, dine, and hang out by adding native plants to your garden and making it a pesticide-free zone.

About two weeks ago, a newsletter from the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) arrived in my email inbox informing me that April 13-21 is Native Plant Week here in California.

I decided to use Native Plant Week as an opportunity to encourage other native plant novices, like me, to embrace native plants. When you give native plants a place in your yard or garden, you will attract native wildlife and signal to those who are just passing through that this is a good place to pause and take a break.

Ever since my spouse and I moved from Southern California to the Monterey pine forest of the California Central Coast about twelve years ago, we have been on a mission to restore our tiny piece of land. After years of invasive plant removal and spreading literally tons of wood chips to revive the parched soil, I realized I needed to learn about native plants.

I joined the CNPS chapter in San Luis Obispo. At my first meeting in October 2017, I met Marti and became interested in trying to grow native plants from seeds. You can meet the first plant I ever grew from a seed in the post, entitled Growing Native Plants from Seeds is Fun and if you are interested in the environmental benefits of native plants, I covered that topic in Native Plants are Good for the Environment.

6 Pots with Seedlings Grown from Native Plant Seeds - Apr 2019
Seedlings sprouted from seeds I obtained at the CNPS San Luis Obispo seed in exchange in October 2018 shown in April 2019 (left to right) – thrift seapink, coast bush lupine, coyote mint, purple needlegrass, purple sage, arroyo lupine.

The joy of growing native plants mostly occurs during the journey from seed to mature plant, but even the mishaps can be fun. My yard is mostly wild and your yard will be different from mine anyway, but perhaps you have had some similar experiences.

Native Plant Novice

To keep things simple I opted to experiment with growing native plant seeds using the tools and resources a non-expert might have on hand like a garden trowel, plastic pots from nursery plants, potting soil, a watering can, and something to use for plant markers. I planted my second batch of seeds in November 2018 without any special preparation.

This year I have been keeping a handwritten journal of what I observe happening with the seeds and a few small plants, we planted in our yard.

Becky the Buckwheat has a Birthday

I am one of those people who anthropomorphize animals and trees. It helps me connect with my non-human neighbors, but if you do not like it, I understand.

The very first plant I ever grew from seed was California buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciulatum). Out of a handful of seeds, it was the only one that germinated. After about nine months in a pot on the deck outside of our dining room, I decided that Becky was ready for the yard. Mindful of the deer that frequent our yard, I planted Becky in a small fenced in section.

I do not know Becky’s exact age, but I planted the seeds in January 2018 and the tiny seedling popped its head above the soil in March or April of that year. Becky went to live in the yard during October 2018 and now in April 2019, Becky is at least a year old and thriving.

Someone Stole My Daisies

For years, I have been admiring the lavender flowered seaside daisies (Erigeron glaucus) that grow on the Fiscalini Ranch Preserve near my house. Last November, when I spotted a variety of seaside daisies at the CNPS San Luis Obispo plant sale, I bought six small plants.

Because the daisies looked like potential deer food to me, they became Becky’s neighbors. The plants seemed happy and I could see them from a window in our stairwell. One day I looked out and sensed something was wrong so I went outside to investigate.

Four of the six plants were completely gone (not eaten) disappeared. It was the voles. I could tell by the little holes backfilled with loose dirt. The voles would not come out to discuss the situation so I can only surmise that seaside daisies are much sought after as bedding material or food for voles.

That afternoon I dashed over to the local nursery to purchase some flexible mesh gopher cages. My spouse helped me dig up the two remaining plants and replant their roots inside the cages. That ended the carnage. The plants made it through the winter but I would say they look more as if they are just surviving versus thriving.

Plant Hide-and-Seek

In November 2018, feeling extra ambitious I expanded the number of varieties of seeds I would attempt to grow and decided to carefully plant a few in my yard along with a couple of plants that I had purchased at the San Luis Obispo Botanical Garden plant sale in October.

I carefully weeded a five-foot circle, planted a small Hearst ceanothus (Ceanothus hearstiorum) and three groupings of seeds marked with plant markers I made from an old sign.

The deer or someone was probably laughing as I did this. Within days, the ceanothus had been eaten down to a nub, so we fenced in the area. Months later, the wild grasses took over and any tiny seedlings trying to make a go of it have either been outcompeted, eaten as soon as they popped up their heads, or are in there somewhere that I just cannot see.

Group Insurance

In the past, I have often purchased one plant to try out in a particular area. Last fall, I thought maybe it would be helpful to plant two or three of the same type of plant in the same area.

At the November CNPS plant sale, along with the ill-fated seaside daisies, I purchased six tiny California fuchsia (Epilobium canum) seedlings grown by Clearwater Color Wholesale Nursery in Los Osos. The plants were about 3” tall when I planted them in pots and set them outside our dining room window.

They seemed happy and grew steadily. After the seedlings reached about 6” tall, I decided they might enjoy going to live in the yard.

Unsure about whether deer have a taste for California fuchsia or not, I decided to plant one plant and see what happened. The deer completely ignored it for a couple of weeks so I decided it was safe to plant the others.

Outside our office window, we have a grouping of three and a grouping of two. I planted the remaining plant near the seaside daisies as an insurance measure in case the deer suddenly develop a taste for California fuchsia.

Getting a Grip

The native plant enthusiasts I meet in our county seem enamored with dudleyas so I purchased three chalk dudleya (Dudleya pulverulenta) at the October Botanical Garden Sale.

I read up about them on Calscape, an online California native plant resource guide, and learned that dudleyas like to be planted at an angle so moisture does not pool around them and they enjoy living with rocks.

We have a small rocky section next to our driveway so I planted the three dudleyas in a triangle and hoped for the best. Periodically, I hand weed around them and they seem to be well established now.

My action for California Native Plant Week was to write this post. I hope you enjoyed the above plant stories and laughed at least once. Now, it is your turn to take action.

California Native Plant Week Actions

  • Share your own native plant stories and/or expertise.
  • Learn about native plants by going on a native plant garden tour or visiting a botanical garden.
  • Sign up for a native plant walk in your area.
  • Locate a nursery that sells native plants, pick one to try, and plant three of them in your yard or garden.
  • Join your local native plant society. The American Horticulture Society lists every state on their website.

“Native plants are the foundation of ecosystems, supporting pollinators, birds, and the natural resources we all need for survival.”

Liv O’Keeffe, California Native Plant Society

Featured Image at Top: I think these are coyote mint (Monardella villosa) plants that sprouted from seeds I scattered in the yard.

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5 Reasons to Buy Rooftop Solar Panels in 2019

Don’t wait for another year.

Have you been putting off installing rooftop solar panels on your home? If so, 2019 is a good year to take action and actually do it. Why this year? Read on.

The American media seems to take pleasure in portraying us as a bunch of money-grubbing consumers who are only out for ourselves, but I am not buying it. We do not have to listen to them.

I believe that we can use our purchasing power to benefit the greater good and ourselves.

Sometimes it might be a small purchase like buying socks at a locally owned store instead online and having them shipped to you via an airplane. Or opting to buy organic spinach grown by a local farmer instead of spinach that comes in a sealed plastic bag from somewhere out of state.

A rooftop solar system is a big purchase that meets the above criteria.

In this post, we will talk about how purchasing rooftop solar panels for your home is a long-term investment that will pay for itself and more, add renewable energy capacity to your community, and support local jobs.

March 8, 2019, marked the beginning of the seventh year that our rooftop solar system has been silently generating clean renewable energy from the sun. Our system is tied to the electric grid so we share electricity back and forth with PG&E the investor-owned utility currently providing service to our county.

Let’s deal with the financial stuff first.

Save Money on Electricity

The net cost of our 22-panel 5.34 kW rooftop solar system was $14,767 including tax credits that we will discuss later. Solar prices have been decreasing so now our system would cost less.

Purchasing rooftop solar panels requires a significant investment upfront. Beware of sticker shock that may cause you to waver and lose sight of the long-term benefits.

I propose a little exercise to help you think about a large amount of money in a different way and this one never pays for itself or provides free electricity.

Many people, perhaps including you, have a habit of buying a cafe latte, specialty juice drink, or another treat each day during the workweek.

Let’s say you do that 48 out of 52 weeks a year. To make it simple we will use $5.00 as the cost of the treat. Below is an example of how much money you will spend over a ten-year period on just that one item.

Rows of Green Dollar Signs

5 items a week x 48 weeks a year = 240
items per year x 10 years = 2,400 items x $5.00 each = $12,000.

You may think this is a silly example, but it does demonstrate how you, I, and everyone else can easily spend a large amount of money without really thinking about it.

Payback Period

Your tangible electricity savings will begin at the end of your payback period, which is however long it takes your electricity savings to equal the total net cost of your rooftop solar system.

Last May, I decided to attempt to calculate the payback period for our solar panel system.

I had the data. However, I soon discovered the complexity of the task. It would mean calculating electricity costs on an hourly basis 24/7/365 for 5 years. This was beyond the time I could allow to figuring it out.

Not willing to do nothing, I came up with a method to estimate our payback period, which turned out to be about 7 years. Even though it is likely that there are flaws in my approach, I think that I am well within the ballpark.

At this time next year, our rooftop solar system will have paid for itself and from then on electricity will be virtually free for the next two or three decades, except for PG&E fees. Solar panels decrease in efficiency over time, but after the 25-year warranty period ends, they will not suddenly stop working.

If you are interested in how I calculated our payback period, you can read about it in the post Rooftop Solar Panels are Worth It and this is Why.

Increase Your Home’s Value

In recent years, especially here in California, several things have occurred making it even more financially attractive to purchase rooftop solar panels for your home.

  1. In January 2017, the California Regional Multiple Listing Service recognized that a rooftop solar system is a positive selling point for many home buyers so they added standardized fields that enable realtors to enter energy production for their listings.
  2. The California legislature upped the ante on renewable energy in 2018 by enacting a law requiring solar panels on all new homes.
  3. I do not have a crystal ball, but I doubt you will disagree with me when I suggest that electricity prices will only continue to increase. Where I live the average price of a kWh of electricity has steadily increased by 22.4% in the past 6 years, which is substantially higher than the national inflation rate.

When you decide to sell your home, savvy prospective home buyers are likely to appreciate that they can instantly save on their electricity bills without doing a thing.

You can learn more about this topic by reading the post You Can Increase Your Home’s Value with Owned Solar Panels.

Receive a Solar Investment Tax Credit

Mostly free electricity in the future and adding to your home’s value are two sound financial reasons to purchase a rooftop solar system. A compelling reason to do it in 2019 it that this is last year can receive the full 30% federal tax credit.

Solar-Electric Property
  • 30% for systems placed in service by 12/31/2019
  • 26% for systems placed in service after 12/31/2019 and before 01/01/2021
  • 22% for systems placed in service after 12/31/2020 and before 01/01/2022
  • There is no maximum credit for systems placed in service after 2008.
  • Systems must be placed in service on or after January 1, 2006, and on or before December 31, 2021.
  • The home served by the system does not have to be the taxpayer’s principal residence.
The 30% tax credit we received for our initial rooftop solar installation resulted in a refund from the federal government. This photo shows 3 of the 6 additional solar panels we bought with the money.

Visit the DSIRE website to learn more about federal tax credits and state incentive programs.

I hope you can see that owning a rooftop solar system makes financial sense. Now, let’s look at how going solar contributes to the greater good.

Build Renewable Energy Capacity in Your Community

Extracting, transporting, refining, storing, and burning fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas) is a dirty and dangerous business that is jeopardizing the health and well-being of people everywhere, especially the people who live near fossil fuel extraction sites, rail lines, refineries, pipelines, and power plants.

Major Sources of U.S. Electricity Generation 1949-2018 Line Graph
Electricity generation from renewable energy is increasing and coal is decreasing. Unfortunately, natural gas is on the rise. Image credit – U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Each one of us can choose to help our country get off fossil fuels by taking a variety of actions from running our dishwashers after peak electricity demand time to installing solar panels on our roofs.

Using the existing real estate available on top of our homes and other buildings to generate clean renewable energy just makes sense to me. The roof is already there so why not use it. If I were an investor-owned utility executive, I would be renting every rooftop I could get my hands on and installing solar panels.

Keep Your Money in Your Community

I am a fan of locally owned businesses, including solar companies, for a number of reasons. First and most importantly, I know that my money is supporting jobs in my own community versus lining the pockets of far distant shareholders who have never heard of my town or me.

Local companies are embedded in the communities they serve providing jobs, spending money, and contributing to causes important to their employees and the community.

We selected A.M. Sun Solar for our home rooftop solar project. I think they embody what is wonderful about locally owned companies. Here are a few examples.

A.M. Sun Solar Team in 2017
This is the A.M. Sun Solar team shown outside of their office in Paso Robles, CA in 2017. Photo courtesy of A.M. Sun Solar.

The people at A.M. Sun Solar treat me like a person, not a number.

Years after our installation, Glen, Cory, and now Brian, are always willing to answer questions or provide information for a post I am writing.

The company gives back to the community by donating time and money to local organizations like Jack’s Helping Hand and the Paso Robles Children’s Museum.

Of course, just like any other company that you give your business to a locally owned company needs to provide quality products and services at a reasonable price. I chronicled this aspect of our relationship with A.M. Sun Solar in the posts Go Solar with Home Rooftop Photovoltaics – We Did and Rooftop Solar Costs Less than You Think.

Be Part of the Solution

Okay, so now I have shown you the money and presented you with an opportunity to help build the renewable energy capacity of your community while supporting local jobs. What could be better?

If you call a local solar company tomorrow, you could have solar panels on your roof before the arrival of the hot summer weather. This time next year you could be claiming the 30% tax credit on your federal income tax return.

Better yet, you will be taking a significant step to live more lightly on Earth.

Our Rooftop Solar Environmental Benefits March 2013-March 2019
This image shows the energy production and carbon offset for our rooftop solar panel system from March 2013 to March 2019.

Featured Image at Top: 12 of the 16 solar panels that were installed on our roof during our initial installation in 2013.

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