Breast Cancer Awareness – Mr. Pruitt Do Your Job

I will not be silent! What about you?

Breast Cancer Awareness Month prompted me to write to EPA chief Scott Pruitt requesting that he do his job, which is protecting human health and the environment.

As an American, a mother, and a breast cancer survivor I am outraged that Administrator Pruitt is purposefully enabling industries to pollute our air, water, and land. It is shocking and frightening that the top ranking environmental official in the United States is actively trying to dismantle the organization that he is supposed to be leading while endangering the health and well-being of Americans all across the country.

I doubt I am the only person who sees a connection between carcinogens and other harmful substances in our environment and people getting cancer and a myriad of other horrible diseases. Pruitt should be eliminating pollution and toxins from our environment not adding to them.

On Monday, October 9, 2017, I saw the news stories reporting that Pruitt announced he is repealing the Clean Power Plan instead of implementing it. Watching Pruitt on video proclaiming, “The war on coal is over” was disturbing. As the head of the EPA, he should be declaring, “The war on air pollution is on.”

This same man says that he is first and foremost, a family man. If he really is a family man then why is he not doing everything in his power to protect human health and the environment? After all, his daughter and son need a habitable planet to live on along with billions of other people and living creatures.

I will not be silent!

Even if someone shreds my letter as soon as it arrives at EPA headquarters and it never makes it to Pruitt’s desk, I felt compelled and obligated to write it and put it in the mail. I am including a copy of the letter in this post.

Write Your Own Letter

You can join me by writing your own letter to Administrator Pruitt. In my dreams, a million letters written by concerned Americans decorated with pink ribbons magically make it past Pruitt’s censors and fill his office to the ceiling.

Make a Public Comment Online

If you do not feel like writing a letter, or even if you do, you can share your thoughts with Administrator Pruitt by making a public comment related to the EPA’s fiscal year 2018-2022 strategic plan.

The 38-page draft strategic plan outlines the EPA’s priorities for the next four years. If you are at all concerned about the state of the environment and/or climate change, it is worth your time to read it and then make a public comment.

Making a public comment is easy. The following link will take you directly to EPA-HQ-OA-2017-0533 on the regulations.gov website. From there you can read the draft plan and enter a public comment (you may make an anonymous comment if you do not want to provide your name).

For my public comment, I excerpted a paragraph from my letter to Administrator Pruitt and then uploaded a copy of the letter as an attachment.

The deadline for public comments is October 31, 2017. Make your comment today!

My Letter to EPA Administrator Pruitt

2017-10-09 EPA Administrator Pruitt Letter - Breast Cancer Awareness and EPA Strategic Plan

 

Reader Note: if you are interested in learning more about breast cancer, the EPA, Scott Pruitt, or environmental legislation, you will find information in the posts and resources sections below.

Featured Image at Top: Portraits of Women Forming a Map of the United States Representing Breast Cancer Awareness – Image Credit iStock/bubaone

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Resources

New Year’s Resolutions for 2017 – Hit the Reset Button

Red Reset Button

Making a New Year’s resolution or hitting the reset button on a previous resolution is a positive way to begin 2017, especially after a life-changing event.

Each January, I make a New Year’s resolution along with millions of other Americans. I look forward to it because I enjoy setting goals for myself and then trying to achieve them. January marks the beginning of a new year giving me the impetus I need to decide on my resolution and then begin working towards keeping it.

One survey shows that although 45% of Americans usually make a New Year’s resolution only about 8% actually fulfill them.1 Does this mean we are a nation of losers, underachievers, or poor performers? No, it makes us human. We do not always finish what we set out to do and sometimes life throws us a nasty curveball when we are not looking.

My curveball was breast cancer.

I know this may sound crazy or silly, but making a New Year’s resolution for 2017 is an important milestone for me. It is a small but significant act demonstrating that instead of well-meaning medical receptionists running my life, I am in the driver’s seat again and I am free to make my own big and small decisions.

Maybe, making a New Year’s resolution can help you on your road to recovery.

No New Year’s Resolutions in 2015 and 2016

In January 2015, I was contemplating several New Year’s resolutions including greening my personal care products, ridding our yard of invasive plant species, or learning about sustainable clothing.

Then, a phone call from my doctor changed everything. I can still clearly remember her voice saying, “You have invasive breast cancer.” I am one of the fortunate people whose cancer was treatable.

Having cancer derailed all my plans. I did not make a New Year’s resolution in 2015 and in 2016; it was not even on my radar screen.

Now, I am well and grateful to be back at the helm of my life.

My New Year’s Resolution for 2017

For 2017, I am hitting the reset button on a previous New Year’s resolution, eating a healthy diet.

In previous years, I had made and kept a series of New Year’s resolutions involving diet and exercise. As 2015 began, I was eating a healthy diet and walking at least two miles a day. My weight was good for my height and my knees had thanked me for lessening their load a little. I was in top form; well, except I had breast cancer.

In a shockingly short amount of time after beginning chemotherapy, my good eating and exercise habits became impossible to maintain. At one point during treatment, I could only drink my meals (smoothies and milkshakes) or eat very soft foods like bananas (I hate bananas now), mashed potatoes, and ice cream. Walking for five or ten minutes was the best I could do.

Fast forward through surgery and radiation treatment, I began walking more each day. Now, I am back to walking two miles a day and I can hike up a mountain again but at a slower pace than before I had cancer.

Getting back to a healthy diet was a stumbling block for me. Although I began eating well-balanced meals as soon as I could, I also indulged my food whims and cravings. This resulted in eating far too many calories and sweets. My knees let me know they do not appreciate the extra weight.

My New Year’s Resolution for 2017 is to dust off my healthy eating resolution from years past. I have a slight advantage over other New Year’s resolution makers because since I have accomplished this one in the past, I know I can do it again.

Your New Year’s Resolution for 2017

If you are recovering from your own life-changing event, maybe making a New Year’s resolution can help you start 2017 off in a positive way, too. Or, try hitting the reset button on a previously unfulfilled New Year’s resolution that you want to accomplish.

For readers who would like some help on establishing a realistic New Year’s resolution, consider reading the post entitled, New Year’s Resolution – Make it SMARTER. If you are interested in a green New Year’s resolution, there are links to several posts below that may give you some ideas.

Please encourage other readers by sharing your New Year’s resolution for 2017.

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References

  1. Statistic Brain – New Year’s Resolution Statistics, 12/11/16