Walking – Pedometer versus Fitness Tracker

Be healthy and green. Walk more, drive less.

Walking is good for your health and the planet. A pedometer or fitness tracker can be fun and help you stay accountable to yourself.

For our early ancestors, walking was an integral part of daily life and they walked everywhere. Getting from point A to point B contributed to staying fit and healthy and did not involve polluting the environment.

Nowadays, it seems like many people view walking as something to avoid if possible by driving places they could easily walk to in 10 or 15 minutes or sitting in idling cars waiting for the closest parking space. To compound matters, a lot of people work at sedentary jobs requiring sitting for long periods.

Fortunately, human beings are adaptable and we are able to learn new habits and renew previous ones. If you have gotten out of the habit of walking, you can choose to make walking part of your daily life, again.

A pedometer or fitness tracker can help you stay on track and give you a sense of accomplishment. Hopefully, the information below will help you determine if a pedometer or fitness tracker might be right for you and what type of product and features will help you fulfill your walking goals.

Pedometer Overview ($25 to $35)

Omron Alvita Ultimate Pedometer in GreyThe main function of a pedometer is to count your steps and estimate the distance you travel in a day. Most models will also estimate the number of aerobic (heartbeat-raising) minutes you walk and calories you burn, display the time, and hold seven days worth of memory.

Pedometer Set Up

Before setting up your pedometer, you will need to calculate your stride by walking 10 steps, measuring the distance with a tape measure, and dividing by 10. Repeat this process several times to make sure you are walking with your normal stride or it will skew your data. As an example, my normal walking stride is 210” divided by 10 = 21” or 1’-9.”

To set up your pedometer you enter the time and your height, weight, and stride. Then stick it in your pocket or clip it onto your waistband and start walking.

Pedometer Accuracy

The mechanism a pedometer uses to track steps seems to work best when you mostly walk on level ground. They tend to undercount steps when you are walking up or down stairs or hiking up and down hills. Also, keep in mind that your calories burned figure is a ballpark estimate based on limited information.

Fitness Tracker Overview ($50 to $250)

Fitness trackers function as pedometers with a few or a lot of additional features, such as estimating the number of staircases you climb, monitoring your heart rate, tracking your sleep patterns, logging all types of exercise, keeping track of your food and water intake, and integrating into your social media accounts. Some have GPS, texting and email, and alerts, like vibrating to let you know you have been sitting too long.

Fitness trackers use wireless technology to communicate with your smartphone and/or computer. This makes it easy to store, compare, and share your data and achievements.

Important Note – your smartphone needs to be a certain version or above to integrate with your fitness tracker. However, you can just sync your fitness tracker with your computer and track your data online.

Fitness Tracker Set Up

To get started with setting up your fitness tracker, you download the appropriate smartphone and computer apps. Then you create a profile and enter the same information you would for a pedometer. If you choose, enter your exercise and weight goals. Some trackers do not require you enter your stride length, but it is more accurate if you do.

Depending on the product you purchased, put it in your pocket, clip it onto your waistband, or strap it to your wrist and start walking.

Fitness Tracker Accuracy

Fitness trackers usually have more advanced mechanisms and sensors than pedometers so they seem to track steps and calories burned more accurately.

Pedometer versus Fitness Tracker

I bought my first pedometer in January 2010 to help me accomplish my New Year’s resolution of incorporating more walking into my day with a goal of walking 10,000 steps each day. It worked!

Fast forward to early 2016. I was nearing the end of a grueling year of treatment for breast cancer and I was ready to undertake the challenge of regaining my pre-cancer fitness level. It was hard work and I wanted to get “credit” for every step, including walking up and down the stairs in my 2-story house, so I decided to switch to a more accurate step counting fitness tracker.

After conducting research online and reading user reviews, I bought two fitness trackers to try out. I chose the Microsoft Band 2 because it seemed to have the most sophisticated mechanisms for counting steps and I selected the Fitbit One because it is tiny.

Microsoft Band 2 Review

I wore the Band 2 on my wrist for over a year and I even wore it while I slept for a few months. It was interesting to know how many staircases I climbed each day, how many hours of deep sleep I got, and what my heart beat rate was after doing a strenuous task, but it was unnecessary. Wearing something on my wrist was uncomfortable while typing on a computer keyboard and while sleeping.

Microsoft Band 2 Wireless Fitness Tracker

The Band 2 ($249.99) does count steps accurately but I wasted money on features I do not need or use. Microsoft has since discontinued this product.

Fit Bit One Review

I switched to the Fitbit One, which easily fits in my pocket. Although it will track sleep, I have not used the sleep wristband and do not intend to. I enjoy the little flower on the display screen that grows and shrinks depending on my activity level, but it is not necessary.

Fitbit One Wireless Fitness TrackerLike the Band 2, the FitBit One ($99.99) counts steps accurately and has features I do not need or use. However, being able to view my progress on my computer helps me stay motivated and earning badges is fun.

The Bottom Line

A pedometer is an inexpensive tool that can help you build more walking into your daily routine and then stick with it. If you do not walk up and down a lot of stairs or hills or are not that concerned with counting every step, a pedometer is a good choice.

Unless you are a professional athlete or a serious exercise enthusiast, many fitness tracker features might seem cool when you are reading about them but end up being unnecessary. If you want accurate step counting, data tracking, and/or like sharing on social media, a fitness tracker might work best for you.

Me, I am sticking with the Fitbit One because I want “credit” for every step.

Hopefully, the information above will help you decide whether to buy a pedometer or fitness tracker and what things to think about before you do buy one. The bottom line is that walking more and driving less is good for you and the planet.

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Greening the U.S. Federal Government – Executive Order 13514

Starting with George Washington, U.S. Presidents have issued over 15,000 executive orders to date. Do U.S. federal agencies actually fulfill these directives?

I pondered this question while writing the previous post, Green Legislation – Obama Administration, which included a summary of Executive Order 13514 – Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance.

President Obama Participating in Signing Executive Order 13514 on October 5, 2009 - Photo: Peta Souza, White House
President Obama Participating in Signing Executive Order 13514 on October 5, 2009 – Photo: Peta Souza, White House

Some readers may be able to relate to CEOs, executives, and managers handing down the private sector version of executive orders in the form of company-wide or department-wide edicts, directives, or mandates. In my experience, sometimes we followed directives to the letter, other times half-heartedly, and sometimes not at all.

Does the President garner more cooperation than a corporate CEO does? The answer is probably “It depends,” but the President as the Chief Executive of the United States does have the backing of the U.S. Constitution.

I thought it would be fun and informative to find out what actions federal agencies have taken to comply with the directives of EO 13514. Below is a summary of what I learned during a brief investigation.

Executive Order 13514 – Overview

The U.S. federal government occupies over half a million buildings, operates more than 600,000 vehicles, and purchases over $500 billion in goods and services each year 1, which enables federal agencies to make enormous reductions in carbon emissions, water use, and fossil fuel consumption, while using their considerable buying power to influence greening the government supply chain.

President Obama issued Executive Order 13514 – Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance on October 5, 2009, directing federal agencies to lead the country towards a clean energy economy and reduce greenhouse gases by greening their own operations.

The actions and targets outlined in EO 13514 cover a wide range of measures including reducing greenhouse gas emissions, increasing energy efficiency, using renewable energy, conserving water, diverting waste from landfills, improving building performance, and buying environmentally preferable goods and services.

Graywater System at U.S. Airforce Hurlburt Field, FL - Photo: U.S. Air Force
Graywater System at U.S. Airforce Hurlburt Field, FL – Photo: U.S. Air Force

Federal departments and agencies affected by EO 13514 include the Departments of Agriculture, Defense, Energy, Homeland Security, Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, the Social Security Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and others.

Note: EO 13514 uses the federal government’s fiscal year (FY) calendar, which begins on October 1 of one year and ends on September 30 of the next.

Executive Order 13514 – Oversight and Information

The Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Management and Budget jointly oversee EO 13514 implementation and compliance.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security January 2014 Sustainability / Energy ScorecardThe Federal Facilities Environmental Stewardship and Compliance Assistance Center is a one-stop-shopping website providing information, tools, data, status reports, and guidance to assist federal agencies in addressing and fulfilling EO 13514 requirements.

Individual agency scorecards and strategic sustainability performance plans were relatively easy to locate, but I could not find a dashboard or report summarizing progress made to date on a federal government-wide basis, except for energy-related goals.

Executive Order 13514 – Interagency Collaboration

EO 13514 designated various agencies to work together to develop tools and guidelines to assist all agencies. A few examples are below.

  • The DOE led the development of a GHG emission accounting tool and procedure for measuring and reporting progress.
  • The GSA and DOE prepared guidelines to aid agencies in improving fleet energy performance.
  • The EPA led the effort to create guidelines for working with vendors on greening the supply chain.

Executive Order 13514 – Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans

Each agency created a sustainability plan outlining the actions it is taking and intends to take to achieve its goals and comply with EO 13514. Agencies publish scorecards and updated sustainability plans annually.

Progress on Energy Goals

The federal government is the largest energy consumer in the U.S, therefore, reducing fossil fuel use, increasing energy efficiency, and increasing renewable energy use will not only reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions it will save taxpayers billions of dollars.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Goals

EO 13514 requires each federal agency to establish a GHG emission reduction goal based on 2008 estimated emissions and achieve the goal by 2020.

The GHG emissions reduction goal consists of three categories:

  • Scope 1 – direct GHG emissions from federally owned or controlled sources, including fuels, burned on site and vehicle emissions.
  • Scope 2 – indirect GHG emissions from the offsite generation of electricity, heat, or steam purchased by federal agencies.
  • Scope 3 – indirect GHG emissions related to agency activities including vendor supply chains, delivery services, and employee travel.

Federal agencies established their 2020 targets in early January 2010.

On January 29, 2010, President Obama announced the aggregated federal agency goals are to reduce direct GHG emissions by 28% and indirect GHG emissions by 13% by 2020.

As of September 30, 2013, the federal government had reduced direct GHG emissions by 17.2% seemingly on track to meet the 28% goal by 2020 and had exceeded the 13% goal for indirect GHG emissions with a 19.8% reduction.

U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Campus, Golden, CO - Photo: Dennis Schroeder / NREL
U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Campus, Golden, CO – Photo: Dennis Schroeder / NREL
Petroleum Product Use Reduction Goal

Agencies operating a fleet of least 20 motor vehicles are required to reduce consumption of petroleum products by 2% annually through 2020. I could not locate a government-wide progress report on petroleum use.

Renewable Energy Goal

President Obama raised the bar on renewable energy on December 5, 2013, by issuing his Memorandum on Federal Leadership on Energy Management, which requires each agency to obtain 20% of their electricity from renewable energy sources by 2020, beginning with 10% in 2015.

Federal agency renewal energy use was at 9.2% of total energy use in September 2013.

My research indicates that at least in the case of EO 13514 federal agencies do take presidential executive orders seriously.

Greening the U.S. federal government is good for the planet, people, and taxpayer wallets.

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References

  1. Congressional Research Service – Executive Order 13514: Sustainability and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction, by Richard J. Campbell and Anthony Andrews, December 3, 2009

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