5 Must-See Films about Food, Health, and the Environment

Empty Shopping Cart in Grocery Market Aisle

What you don’t know about food can harm you and others. These informative and sometimes troubling films may motivate you to change what you and your family eat.

The industrialized food industry and our own government have been quite successful in convincing us that the food we buy is safe and okay for us to eat as long as we get enough exercise.

However, the increasing rates of obesity, diabetes and other chronic health problems seem to be telling a different story. The wellbeing of the people growing, harvesting, and processing our food is largely ignored as is the harm that is being inflicted on our planet.

We can change the food system by first learning about how our food choices affect our own health, the wellbeing of others, and the condition of our environment and then taking action.

Over the past several years, I have read books and articles and watched films to educate myself about the relationship between the food industry, health, and the environment. I am recommending these five films because they provide a good overview of various food related topics.

After you watch these movies, I hope at least one thing will have sparked your interest and will inspire you to take action.

Food Chains

Imagine you are driving to work and see a group of people standing on the sidewalk holding signs that say things like “I am human too” or “I go hungry today so my children can eat tomorrow.”

This is an actual scene in the movie Food Chains showing a group of tomato pickers and their supporters on a 6-day hunger strike outside a Publix corporate building. They were asking the giant grocery market chain to pay one penny more per pound of tomatoes.

The film tells the story of how the pickers formed the Coalition of Immokalee Workers and founded the Fair Food Program to improve working conditions and wages for farm laborers. Their story is heartbreaking, yet hopeful demonstrating what a small group of people on a mission can accomplish.

Watch Food Chains because the people who harvest our food deserve a dignified life with adequate pay.

Food Choices

Food Choices chronicles filmmaker Michal Siewierski’s three-year journey across the country exploring how our food choices affect not only our own health but also the health of the planet and other living species. His focus is on eating a plant-based diet, however; the film addresses a wide range of topics from eating carbohydrates to organic food.

Watch Food Choices because, in addition to explaining the health and environmental benefits of eating a plant-based diet, it covers other food topics in short easy-to-understand segments.

Food, Inc.

The United States produces more food and sells is at a cheaper price than any other country in the world. But, at what cost to the environment, the animals we raise and kill for food, and the people who grow, harvest, and process our food? Is our highly mechanized and seemingly efficient agricultural industry actually producing healthy and nutritious food? Who controls this vast food system?

To answer these questions and more, Food, Inc. goes behind the scenes and exposes the hidden world of industrialized agriculture that big Ag does not want you to see.

Watch Food, Inc. because it is an eye-opening disturbing film and sometimes that is what we need to propel us to take action.

Sugar Coated

Sugar Coated explores the question, “Is sugar the new tobacco?” meaning a toxic product marketed to us as safe by a powerful industry.

Dr. Cristin Kearns is a dentist who became concerned about how the ever-increasing amount of sugar used in processed foods was affecting her patients’ health. While researching sugar, Dr. Kearns stumbled across the records of a now defunct sugar company documenting how the sugar industry orchestrated a nationwide public relations program during the 1960s and 1970s to assure legislators and the public that sugar was safe and did not cause any health problems.

Watch Sugar Coated for two reasons. First, because we should be concerned about how much sugar we eat and feed our families. Second, it behooves us to remember that sometimes the government does not fulfill its responsibility to protect the wellbeing of its citizens unless we demand it.

Super Size Me

Super Size Me is a film about how the fast food industry influences our eating habits and therefore our health.

After hearing about two teenagers who had attempted to sue McDonald’s for causing their obesity, Morgan Spurlock was inspired to investigate how eating fast food affects physical and psychological wellbeing. Using himself as a guinea pig, he ate only food from McDonald’s for one month and accepted the suggestion to “super size” whenever it was offered. The results were shocking!

Watch Super Size Me because it gives you an opportunity to look at what fast food really is when you are not hungry and waiting in line at the drive-through window.

Please share your thoughts on these films with other readers and let us know if you have any recommendations for other food related films we should watch.

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Books and Films

  • Appetite for Profit (book)
  • Fast Food Nation (book)
  • Fed Up (film)
  • Food Politics (book)
  • Hungry for Change (film)
  • The Omnivore’s Dilemma (book)

Make Thanksgiving Count

Thanksgiving Pecan and Pumpkin Pies

This Thanksgiving, enjoy feasting on your favorite holiday foods, be thankful for your family and friends, and make sure you eat all your leftovers.

Last week, with Thanksgiving approaching, I was contemplating what to write about this year. In previous posts, I covered the green aspects of the first Thanksgiving, Black Friday consumerism, and reflected on green things I believe in, use, or do.

This year, instead of trying to decide which stuffing recipe to prepare, I was speculating about things like how much uneaten food Americans scrape off their Thanksgiving plates into the garbage disposal or how many tons of leftovers we toss in the trash after a week or so of moldering in the back of our refrigerators.

While Thanksgiving meal planners across the country were weighing menu options, wondering where to place Uncle Joe at the dining table, and considering whether to bake both a pumpkin and a pecan pie, I was thinking about overconsumption and food waste.

I know weird, right. I was not always like this.

Anyways, I decided to entitle my blog post Thanksgiving – Lose the Leftovers and proceeded to write several hundred words aimed at convincing you and other readers to strive for a Thanksgiving meal with just enough to eat and no leftovers.

Fortunately, my family saved me from myself. This is how they did it.

My Family Saves Thanksgiving

My Mother had left me a voice mail during the day while I was diligently typing away and ignoring my phone. After finishing the rough draft, I called my Mother back and told her what I was writing about for Thanksgiving.

Her response was immediate and passionate. A lot of people, she claimed, get joy from cooking a big delicious Thanksgiving meal for their loved ones. People should be enjoying time with their families and not worrying about food waste. Besides, leftovers are an important part of Thanksgiving. My points about overconsumption and food waste fell on deaf ears; she assured me that she would have a lot to say in the post’s comment section.

Thankfully, at this point, my spouse rang the dinner triangle (yes, we do have one, made by our son Eric) so I told my Mother I loved her and hung up.

Feeling slightly deflated, but still righteous about my topic, I sat down for dinner and told my family about my conversation with my Mother. It did not go well.

My older son, Eric, immediately agreed with Grandma Joan. He looks forward to eating leftovers after Thanksgiving and would never waste them. My younger son, Adam, said that Thanksgiving is the worst day to try to get people to think about food waste. Thanksgiving is about feasting and enjoyment, not about tackling the world’s problems. The conversation continued downhill from there.

After dinner, I began washing the dishes, mulling over my family’s comments. While I was wiping down the kitchen countertops, I realized that they were right. Thanksgiving is the ideal day to feast and overindulge because it only occurs once a year. We can be mindful of not wasting food the rest of the year. My environmental zeal had gotten the best of me. Writing a post about food waste for Thanksgiving was probably not the best idea.

I am grateful to my frank and loving family for giving me honest feedback. Now, I have no choice but to embrace Thanksgiving and make it count.

Make Thanksgiving Count

This Thanksgiving I am going to enjoy having both my sons at home for the first time in eight years, eat two pieces of pie, go for a walk, play games, and be thankful for my wonderful family who gives me tough love when I need it.

Dear readers, this is my Thanksgiving wish for you.

Delight in feasting on a Thanksgiving meal with all the trimmings. Relish eating two pieces of pie. Leave the dirty dishes on the kitchen counter and go for a walk with your friends and family or play a game or just talk. Be thankful for people and wild things and the beautiful planet we all call home. Eat and savor every morsel of the leftovers in your refrigerator.

Happy Thanksgiving!

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